Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10348/7478
Title: Hydrodynamic Analysis of Different Finger Positions in Swimming: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Approach
Authors: Silva, António José Rocha Martins da
Vilas-Boas, J.P.
Ramos, R.J.
Fernandes, R.J.
Rouboa, A.I.
Machado, L.
Barbosa, T.M.
Marinho, D.A.
Keywords: CFD
performance
sport
aquatics
propulsion
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Journal of Applied Biomechanics
Citation: Results show that finger and thumb positioning in swimming is a determinant of the propulsive force produced during swimming; indeed, this force is dependent on the direction of the flow over the hand and forearm, which changes across the arm’s stroke.
Abstract: The aim of this research was to numerically clarify the effect of finger spreading and thumb abduction on the hydrodynamic force generated by the hand and forearm during swimming. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a realistic hand and forearm model obtained using a computer tomography scanner was conducted. A mean flow speed of 2 m∙s–1 was used to analyze the possible combinations of three finger positions (grouped, partially spread, totally spread), three thumb positions (adducted, partially abducted, totally abducted), three angles of attack (a = 0°, 45°, 90°), and four sweepback angles (y = 0°, 90°, 180°, 270°) to yield a total of 108 simulated situations. The values of the drag coefficient were observed to increase with the angle of attack for all sweepback angles and finger and thumb positions. For y = 0° and 180°, the model with the thumb adducted and with the little finger spread presented higher drag coefficient values for a = 45° and 90°. Lift coefficient values were observed to be very low at a = 0° and 90° for all of the sweepback angles and finger and thumb positions studied, although very similar values are obtained at a = 45°. For y = 0° and 180°, the effect of finger and thumb positions appears to be much most distinct, indicating that having the thumb slightly abducted and the fingers grouped is a preferable position at y = 180°, whereas at y = 0°, having the thumb adducted and fingers slightly spread yielded higher lift values. Results show that finger and thumb positioning in swimming is a determinant of the propulsive force produced during swimming; indeed, this force is dependent on the direction of the flow over the hand and forearm, which changes across the arm’s stroke.
Peer Reviewed: yes
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10348/7478
Document Type: Article
Appears in Collections:DCDES - Artigo publicado em Revista Científica Indexada

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